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e-humanities talks

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On June 19th, 2013 between 3:15 PM and 6:45 PM there are two talks  at the Paulinum, room P801 at Augustusplatz 10/11.   

 

Talk 1: Marianne Reboul (Sorbonne University, Paris, France)

Title: Creating a multiple and interactive translation of Homer's Odyssey –
researches about French and English translations of the Odyssey, XIXth and XXth
century.

Abstract:

The goal is to create an intelligent tool useful to anyone who isinterested in translations of the Odyssey, including everything a translator might need, but also all the texts and resources at hand concerning the establishment of the text and the past translations. This project has many aspects, the most important of which are : 1, the comparison of different French translations, and if possible of certain English translations ; 2, the analysis of the choices made by each translator ; 3, the genealogy of each translation ; 4, the analysis of the timely patterns and schemes visible in several translations at once taking into account the century and literary movement when it was made ; 5, the analysis of the construction of the original text by each translator, and the text they used to make their translations ; 6, the past and present popularity of each translation. Each of these aspects shall be examined in regard to its technical necessities and human demands. All these aspects might be considered as the most important ones in the project.
However, in fine, I would also like to include grammatical and morphological analysis of the Greek text itself, a personal translation and possibly (in a far future) a translating tool sufficiently advanced to give a proper translation.

 

Talk 2: Elton Barker (Open University, Oxford, UK)

Title: A 2013 Space Odyssey: investigating ancient places in a digital
environment

Abstract:

With the digital medium rapidly transforming the ways in which information is viewed and processed, data extraction, visualisation and analysis are key challenges to academic and non-academic groups alike. In this presentation I sketch out three current projects, on which I'm working, that use digital technologies for thinking about the cultural geography of the ancient world.
Involving a research team from Classical Studies, Geography and Computing, Hestia (http://open.ac.uk/Arts/hestia/) develops digital visualisations for analysing spatial relations embedded in Herodotus's Histories, and explores how geographic space is best seen in terms of connections between places and peoples rather than as points on a map. GAP builds on this work by developing an automated means of discovering places in texts and creating an easy-to-use reading platform for visualising the results, so that texts can be read spatially (http://gap.alexandriaarchive.org/gapvis/index.html).

Finally, Pelagios (http://pelagios-project.blogspot.co.uk/) facilitates connections between online classical resources on the basis of their references to ancient places, by virtue of which users can link to and bring together different kinds of data associated with those places, from other texts that mention them, artefacts and inscriptions found there, to digital photos of them.

Last Updated on Monday, 17 June 2013 13:58

 

The banquet of the digital scholars

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Humanities Hackathon on editing Athenaeus and on the Reinvention of the Edition in a Digital Space

October 10-12, 2012
Universität Leipzig (ULEI) & Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (DAI) Berlin

Abstract: The University of Leipzig will host a hackathon that addresses two basic tasks. On the one hand, we will focus upon the challenges of creating a digital edition for the Greek author Athenaeus, whose work cites more than a thousand earlier sources and is one of the major sources for lost works of Greek poetry and prose. At the same time, we use the case Athenaeus to develop our understanding of to organize a truly born-digital edition, one that not only includes machine actionable citations and variant readings but also collations of multiple print editions, metrical analyses, named entity identification, linguistic features such as morphology, syntax, word sense, and co-reference analysis, and alignment between the Greek original and one or more later translations.

Request for Proposal

Co-directors:
Monica Berti - Marco Büchler - Gregory Crane - Bridget Almas

Program:
0.5 day: Introduction / Coding conventions
2 days Hands-on Hackathon
0.5 day: Conclusion of results by participants

Registration Deadline:
September 30, 2012

Requirements / Who should apply:

How to apply:
Please visit www.e-humanities.net
Contact address: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Overview:
The Deipnosophists (Δειπνοσοφισταί, or “Banquet of the Sophists”) by Athenaeus of Naucratis is a 3rd century AD fictitious account of several banquet conversations on food, literature, and arts held in Rome by twenty-two learned men. This complex and fascinating work is not only an erudite and literary encyclopedia of a myriad of curiosities about classical antiquity, but also an invaluable collection of quotations and text re-uses of ancient authors, ranging from Homer to tragic and comic poets and lost historians. Since the large majority of the works cited by Athenaeus is nowadays lost, this compilation is a sort of reference tool for every scholar of Greek theater, poetry, historiography, botany, zoology, and many other topics.

Athenaeus’ work is a mine of thousands of quotations, but we still lack a comprehensive survey of its sources. The aim of this “humanities hackathon” is to provide a case study for drawing a spectrum of quoting habits of classical authors and their attitude to text reuse. Athenaeus, in fact, shapes a library of forgotten authors, which goes beyond the limits of a physical building and becomes an intellectual space of human knowledge. By doing so, he is both a witness of the Hellenistic bibliographical methods and a forerunner of the modern concept of hypertext, where sequential reading is substituted by hierarchical and logical connections among words and fragments of texts. Quantity, variety, and precision of Athenaeus’ citations make the Deipnosophists an excellent training ground for the development of a digital system of reference linking for primary sources. Athenaeus’ standard citation includes (a) the name of the author with additional information like ethnic origin and literary category, (b) the title of the work, and (c) the book number (e.g., Deipn. 2.71b). He often remembers the amount of papyrus scrolls of huge works (e.g., 6.229d-e; 6.249a), while distinguishing various editions of the same comedy (e.g., 1.29a; 4.171c; 6.247c; 7.299b; 9.367f) and different titles of the same work (e.g., 1.4e).

He also adds biographical information to identify homonymous authors and classify them according to literary genres, intellectual disciplines and schools (e.g., 1.13b; 6.234f; 9.387b). He provides chronological and historical indications to date authors (e.g., 10.453c; 13.599c), and he often copies the first lines of a work following a method that probably goes back to the Pinakes of Callimachus (e.g., 1.4e; 3.85f; 8.342d; 5.209f; 13.573f-574a).

Last but not least, the study of Athenaeus’ “citation system” is also a great methodological contribution to the domain of “fragmentary literature”, since one of the main concerns of this field is the relation between the fragment (quotation) and its context of transmission. Having this goal in mind, the textual analysis of the Deipnosophists will make possible to enumerate a series of recurring patterns, which include a wide typology of textual reproductions and linguistic features helpful to identify and classify hidden quotations of lost authors.

Goals:
This humanities hackathon is meant as a mini-course for training participants in editing Athenaeus’ work and his quotations, focusing on these topics:

  • marking up quotations and text re-uses in Athenaeus
  • annotating syntax and aligning translation of Athenaeus’ text
  • using Athenaeus as a way to demonstrate the new Perseus SoSOL (http://sosol.perseus.tufts.edu/sosol/)
  • Greek OCR on Athenaeus’ editions
  • identifying and investigating quotations and text re-uses of Homer and Plato by Athenaeus
  • comparing the ways in which Athenaeus and Plutarch quotes Homer and Plato; the goal is to use the computer to investigate how stable is an author’s re-use style in different sources
  • results of this Hackathon will be made publicly available under CC licence.

Applications should be sent to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Last Updated on Monday, 17 September 2012 08:50

 

2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar Schedule

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The Final event of the eHumanities seminar took place on February 6, 2013, at 5:00 PM (till 6:00 PM) in the room P 801 at the Paulinum.

Program:
  • Seminar takes place on Wednesdays at 3:15 PM (till 6:45 PM) in room P801 at the Paulinum building (8th floor) on the University campus
  • The opening session on Oct 10th is held at the Felix-Klein-Hörsaal (P501), on the 5th floor.

Oct 10th

pdfAbstracts
Simon Mahony (Centre for Digital Humanities, University College London, London,   UK) 

Room:
P501

 

Federico Boschetti (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy) & Bruce   Robertson (Dept. of Classics, Mount Allison University, Canada) 
 

 

Room:
P501

 

Clemens Neudecker (National Library of the Netherlands, The Hague, Netherlands), Sven   Schlarb (Austrian National Library, Vienna, Austria) & Zeki Mustafa Dogan (Goettingen State and University   Library, Göttingen, Germany) 
 
Room:
P501

Oct 17th

Cerstin Mahlow (Departement   Sprach- und Literaturwissen-schaften, Universität Basel, Switzerland) 
 

Exploring   diachronic German corpora with respect to phraseologic information pdf 

Room:
P801

 

Michael Piotrowski (Law Sources Foundation of the Swiss Lawyers Society, Zurich,   Switzerland)
 
Room:
P801

Oct 24th

 pdfAbstracts

Michael Carl (Copenhagen Business   School, Frederiksberg, Denmark)

Digital   Humanities and Empirical Human Translation Process Research pdf  

 
Room:
P801

 

Tom Cheesman (Dept of Languages,   Translation and Communication, Swansea University, UK), Kevin Flanagan (Dept of Languages, Translation and Communication,   Swansea University, UK), Stephan Thiel   (Studio Nand, Berlin, Germany), Zhao   Geng (Department of Computer Science, Swansea University, UK)
 

Exploring   Multiple Versions of Cultural Heritage Texts Across Languages pdf

Room:
P801

Nov 07th

 pdfAbstracts

Diego Jiménez-Badillo (National Institute of   Anthropology and History, Mexico) 
 
Room:
P801

 

 
Stefan Gradmann (Humboldt   University, Berlin, Germany), Jonathan Gray (Open Knowledge Foundation   Royal Holloway, University of London, UK) & Christian Morbidoni   (Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy)
 

Room:
P801

Nov 14th

 
       pdfAbstracts

Maximilian Schich (SOMS, ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Room:
P801

Nov 28th

Øyvind Eide (Unit for Digital   Documentation, University of Oslo, Norway) 
Room:
P801

 


Mieszko Chowaniec
(Faculty of Philosophy,   Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)
 


Quellenforschung: a digital tool for the study of   sources pdf


Room:
P801

Dec 05th

 pdfAbstracts

Serge Heiden (ICAR Laboratory,  ENS de Lyon/CNRS  Lyon,   France)
 
Room:
P801

 

Matthis Krischel, Thorsten Halling, Heiner Fangerau   (Institut für Geschichte, Theorie und Ethik der Medizin, Universität Ulm,   Germany)


 

Room:
P801 

Dec 12th

Pau de Soto Cañamares (Instituto de Arqueología   de Mérida – Spanish National Research Council, MÉRIDA, Spain)

Quantifying the Roman Transport Networks   Understanding the costs of Roman commerce  using innovative GIS-based   applications for archaeology pdf

 
Room:
P801

 

Fabian Bartsch, Michael   Prilop, Liina Tonisson, Lutz Maicher   (Competitive Intelligence Group, Fraunhofer MOEZ, Leipzig) 
 
Room:
P801

Dec 19th

 pdfAbstracts




Eleni Bozia (Department of Classics,   University of Florida, USA), Angelos Barmpoutis (Digital Worlds Institute,   University of Florida, USA), and Robert Wagman (Department of Classics,   University of Florida, USA)

Room:
P801

 

Alexander Mehler (Computer Science, Goethe   University Frankfurt am Main) 

Matje van de Camp (Tilburg University, Netherlands)
Automatic Analysis and Synthesis of Complex   Linguistic Networks


Leveraging historic social networks using present-day data pdf
Room:
P801



Room:
P801

Last Updated on Tuesday, 19 March 2013 08:37

   

European Summer School C&T

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Cultures and technologies should not be understood as referring to computer science applied to cultural studies. The central concern are the Humanities, which are concerned with culture in the broadest sense. Those fields within the Humanities that integrate technologies and computing in their research and which are at least potentially in dialogue with the questions posed by the Digital Humanities are our privileged addressees.

The school was originally conceived as "European" in order to emphasise the object of promoting and developing the Digital Humanities within a European context. The applications of participation submitted for the 2. Summer School demonstrated clearly, however, that the Summer School was already acknowledged as an institution in Europe, qua an established European institution.

The adjective "European" underlines, furthermore, the generally multilingual and multicultural nature of scientific research.

Further information

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 June 2012 13:11

 

2012-06-26: Talk by guest speaker Monica Berti

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Title: Assembling bricks in the toy box: quotations and text re-use detection of lost works

Abstract:The aim of this paper is to present characteristics and components of quotations and re-uses of ancient texts, in order to define a model applicable to other text corpora. Classical sources offer a great variety of quotations and re-uses of both preserved and lost works, covering many forms of excerpting, transforming, and re-adapting texts. Quotations of lost works are very helpful in defining strategies and tools for recovering hidden texts, being therefore suitable for modern collections and incomplete text-reuse detection. As with a Lego toy storage box, whose goal is to collect bricks of different size and colour that can be assembled and interlocked in many ways, detecting quotations and text-reuses means gathering fragments and traces of original texts that are scattered in many different contexts, assembling them in multiple forms for reconstructing our cultural heritage and making it available in digital libraries.

Bio: Monica Berti is research assistant professor of Classics at the University of Roma Tor Vergata and lecturer in Classics at Tufts University. She has been visiting scholar at the Perseus Digital Library and is leading a project called “Fragmentary Texts” (http://www.fragmentarytexts.org/), whose goal is to devise models for annotating and representing quotations of lost texts in digital collections. With Gregory R. Crane and Anke Lüdeling she is co-director of the NEH Institute "Working with text in a digital age", which will be held at Tufts University on July 23-August 10, 2012 (http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/).

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 June 2012 13:11

   

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